Hyperion: Daddy Issues Review

I’m back here for the second part of this DC and Marvel counterpart review. Gonna cap things off now with Hyperion, Marvel’s Superman (well the most blatant one.)

Like Nighthawk, Hyperion ended up in the main Marvel universe but decided to become a truck driver to explore America. At one stop he is approached by a girl named Doll who is on the run from some evil carnies. Hyperion fights them back and now they’re on a road trip style adventure to stop this carnival. Also, Hyperion’s murder of Namor doesn’t go unnoticed so a battle with Iron Man occurs.

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Alright like Nighthawk this book was cancelled at issue six and while it wasn’t as bad as Nighthawk it still wasn’t very good. There are positives though so I wanna mention those at least. The art was pretty good, it’s bright and clean and gives this road trip story an indie feel. It works well when there are horror elements to the story like the Carnies powers and designs. Hyperion, aka Mark, while having the Superman knockoff origin story and abilities, has a little bit of personality. He is more grizzled and knowledgeable and is just a pretty cool character in his own way. The new character for the story, Doll, is an alright contrasting character to him. She’s got a generic overexcited, tomboy personality but it’s not annoying like most characters like this.

Now for the negative side of things. First, the villains were weak. They were just weird carnies and only one was a threat to Hyperion in battle and he gets taken out first. After that they’re just a bunch of hillbillies fighting a Superman so obviously there’s no tension. Iron Man is another villain in the story technically and he was just annoying. He’s written to try and be witty and snarky and he just doesn’t shut up. I think this was done so you’d want Hyperion to beat him up, which he does really easily.

I’m pretty mixed on this book but I do think the pros do outweigh the cons in the end, so I can’t call this rubbish. If you like the character or want a road trip comic I’d recommend it but for anyone else I’d just borrow it, which is what I did.

Writer:Chuck Wendig

Artist: Nik Virella

Rating: Borrow From A Mate

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Nighthawk: Hate Makes Hate Review

Nighthawk, a member of the Squadron Supreme, is somehow transported to the mainstream Marvel universe and ends up in Chicago. Of course Chicago is in the middle of racial tension as a police officer is currently on trial for the shooting of an unarmed black teenager. There is also a string of murders as white people who have somehow caused problems for black people are being killed off. Nighthawk straps on his Yeezys and teams up with a woman named Tilda to fight some white supremacists and take down the serial killer.

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So after reviewing those two comics starring DC’s flagship character’s, Superman and Batman, I just happened to read two Marvel comics about their counterparts, Hyperion and Nighthawk. Hyperion will be the next review but I wanted to talk about Nighthawk first.

Nighthawk really isn’t good. This series was cancelled at issue six so this is the only volume and I can understand why. None of the characters are interesting, the plot is so boilerplate and uninteresting, the murder mystery is one of the worst I’ve seen, and the art has one very big problem.

First off, Nighthawk himself isn’t well written here. He has flashbacks to his parents telling him to control his rage but it never has any resolution, he just ignores them really. Him going too far and struggling to control it could be interesting but it’s just not handled well, especially because he murders so many people right at the beginning. The other characters include his assistant, his Alfred, Tilda who is so obnoxious. She just goes on and on about how she used to be this great supervillain and that she fought Captain America once. She’s like Uncle Rico from Napoleon Dynamite, just living in the past. Me not knowing who she even was before this comic makes her bragging all the more annoying. Also in this book are just cliche cops who all act like rookies or are just corrupt and rich, racist white guys.

Secondly, the story is weak. The murderer, The Revelator, is just killing bad white people who have done things to black people. He doesn’t really have a personality and all of his motivations are told by other characters. The worst thing would have to be how it teases this mystery about who the Revelator is but you never get the answer. Nighthawk goes to research the guy but then it becomes a message about how the murderer could just be anyone who feels oppressed.  The secondary story about this rich evil white guy selling guns is terrible too. He has the most cliche motivation, money.

My last point is going to be on the art. It’s fairly decent and I liked the covers for this series. However, their is an odd coloring decision I have to address. For whatever reason blood is colored pink for the most part. It takes any seriousness out of the gory fight scenes. Even worse though is the final issue, where in a very important scene a character has brown blood just smeared all over him. It just looks ridiculous and removes all impact from the scene.

Overall Nighthawk was a bad and sloppy comic. Nothing came together and this comic was canned really quickly and will be forgotten just as quickly.

Writer: David F. Walker

Artist: Ramon Villalobos

Rating: Rubbish

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Angel: Revelations

As an X-Men fan I know some stuff about them. But out of the original 5 X-Men: Cyclops, Marvel Girl, Iceman, Beast, and Angel. Of the five Angel is the one I know the least about. I know he’s got wings and sometimes he turns blue and fights the team but who doesn’t now a days. So when in 2008 a 5 issue miniseries titled Angel:Revelations came out I picked it up to learn all I needed to know. And this is when I learned that there wasn’t much to the story.

My main problem with this miniseries is how cliche it is. Warren Worthington the Third is a rich kid in a private, religious school so already he’s not relatable to me. He’s got a rival who is a jock, a cheerleader girlfriend, and a loser of a best friend. It’s like they grabbed every teenager story and tried to graft it onto one character, so Warren is a good athlete and he has a girlfriend but he hangs out with a loser. There’s also a pedophile priest, who abuses the loser kid, and the way the story just kinda brushes this off later is lazy. Warren was only a likable character when he was worrying about his wings and near the end when he becomes Angel.

On the pros side I really liked the villain. He’s an unnamed psychopath who disguises himself as a priest to gain access to places he needs to go. He kidnaps a little mutant girl after killing her parents. The girl has the power to locate other mutants so the psycho uses her to hunt them down. The guy’s got an imposing presence and they manage to make him a looming threat throughout the story.The art is a style I haven’t seen before. The character designs are all wonky because everyone’s got elongated limbs and stubby faces. The shading is pretty dark too, which I don’t mind in the darker parts of the story. The coloring is a bit dull though.

Final Thoughts: All in all it’s a generic story, but I must admit I did start to like the characters at the end.

Rating: Borrow from a mate

 

Marvel Zombies Return

Let’s just end this. This book is the finale of the original Marvel Zombies story that got sidetracked after Marvel Zombies 2. It is also just absolutely awful.

Alright, the book is 5 issues long with the first 4 issues showing off what happened to the Marvel Zombies after they were teleported away by Cortez.

The first issue is the Spider-Man story, which probably had the best concept based on the art alone. It has this silver age vibe to it and I really like it. However, the story is just zombie Spider-Man killing the Sinister Six in increasingly gory ways.

Issue 2 is about Iron Man, but not the zombie Iron Man. It’s a retelling of “Demon In a Bottle” but with zombies attacking. Everyone but Rhodey dies, and he takes Iron Man’s place.

Issue 3 stars Wolverine. Zombie Wolverine fights another Wolverine and gets wrecked. I could barely tell what was going on in this issue because the art is so muddy. I couldn’t even root for either Wolverine because I forgot who was the zombie and who was the normal guy.

Issue 4 is World War Hulk with zombies. The end. Nothing else happens beyond that statement.

Issue 5 is where everyone comes together. They show a group of zombie heroes and villains who are all supposed to be Justice League analogues inside a base next to a dead Galactus. They talk about killing Black Panther, Luke Cage, and Wasp so there goes the only likable characters from the previous story. The four heroes from the previous issues arrive and fight these other zombies. Sandman appears and kills them all using some nanites that Spider-Man helped make. Giant Man, who had been appearing and planning something since the beginning, tries to trap the Sentry to use a battery to teleport to another universe to feed off. Uatu the Watcher appears and sends the Sentry back in time to the original zombie universe to contain the virus, creating a time loop.

Final Thoughts: I was confused throughout because the first two issues don’t mention that this is “Earth Z” so the timeline was messing with me. After all the zombies are killed they show Iron Man still hovering around. But earlier he mentions that heat seeking missiles don’t work on our kind, so he is also a zombie. So that means zombies are still around and the virus isn’t contained, negating the point of the entire book.

Rating: Rubbish

 

Civil War

Alright, the Civil War movie is coming out so everybody else is going to be making these Civil War reviews, right? And it’s almost time for the awards show so I’m just going to crack on with this one.

I’m pretty sure you all know the plot outline but if you don’t then here you go. The New Warriors cause an explosion in Stamford while they are fighting some super villains, killing 612 people. This causes the government to create a superhero registration act that forces superheroes to reveal their identity and work for the government. The Pro-Registration team is led by Iron Man, Mr. Fantastic, and Hank Pym. The Anti-Registration force is led by Captain America with help from Daredevil, Falcon, and Nick Fury. The two sides fight for a while, people die, and everyone just looks above each other while puffing their lips.

Now there is some good in this book, but there is also a lot to hate. A lot of that comes from how illogical most of the story is. The director of Shield, Maria Hill, tries to arrest Captain America before the Registration Act is even signed, there is this annoying woman who lost her kid in the explosion, who basically keeps the war going by cheering on Tony, Johnny Storm is put into a coma by random people just because he’s a superhero.

So now the good stuff. The art is very good, with dark colors and settings that convey the mood that there is no good solution in a tragedy like this. The fight scenes, which are most of the book, are really cool, with all the heroes and villains showing their best. The scenes with the members of the Fantastic Four are the best parts of the book. Captain America does make a good lead, but in a story where there are two sides with valid points, one character shouldn’t be the main focus. And that leads to the worst part, the ending. Most people know who wins, but I’ll still try to not spoil it. One side is definitely shown to be in the wrong, with everything they do causing more and more problems. However, they’re the side that “wins.” It’s anticlimactic and wastes all the buildup the story had.

Final Notes: I had a hard time finding any images with the puffy lip thing I noticed, but if you read this book you’ll notice it fairly quick. Spider-Man is in this, but his scenes are more about setting up his own book than advancing the story in any way.

Rating:Borrow from a mate

Superior Iron Man

Tony Stark was never the nicest hero in Marvel. He has done some terrible things, especially during the Civil War. So when his worst aspects get brought out during AXIS, he decides he has to be Superior.

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Superior Iron Man was a series written by Tom Taylor which came out in 2015 and ran for 9 issues. Basically, Tony is now the villain of the story while Pepper Potts and a mysterious person are trying to get him back to normal. The previously mentioned worst aspects of Tony return, his alcoholism, his greed and most definitely his ego. To go along with this new attitude he makes himself a shiny new chrome suit, which is powered by a symbiote (because that worked so well for the Iron Rangers.)

I really was on board for this Superior version of Tony and the series is very good, but then the last 3 issues kinda drop the ball. I’ll get back to that later but I wanna talk about the good stuff. First off, Tony’s plan to become rich and famous using the Extremis virus on San Fransisco was evil and genius. He gives people a free trial to make them perfect for a day, but then makes it cost $99.99 so only the rich can pay for it. This leads to the city tearing itself apart as the rich get better and the poor become criminals to try and buy Extremis. His plan is so well planned out not even Daredevil can stop it.

There’s also the introduction to a new character, Teen Abomination. He starts off as a joke villain in the first issue but soon becomes like a son to Tony. There’s an issue dedicated to his origin which is sad, but a little generic. After that he has no real role in the book except to be Tony’s bodyguard. So now we got to the cons. The “dropping the ball” comes in the reveal of Pepper’s accomplice. I won’t spoil it but it is foreshadowed pretty well. So after that the book becomes another Tony vs his own armor type story we’ve seen a bunch of times before. It then ends with no real purpose or climax to the story.

Final Thoughts: If it wasn’t for Secret Wars I think this book could have gone on for longer and gotten even better. Every scene with Daredevil and Tony are fantastic and it makes the book almost worth it just for those. The art is also really good throughout.

Rating: Full Price

Avengers Vs. X-Men

Real life got in the way, doesn’t matter, let’s get on with the review

Avengers vs. X-Men was a Marvel comics event from 2012 written by Brian Michael Bendis, Matt Fraction, Jason Aaron, Ed Brubaker and Jonathan Hickman. The maxi-series spanned 12 issues, with each writer scripting different issues. Having 5 people all working separately on the same book could cause some issues, and sadly that’s what happened here. Let’s get to the plot outline first.

The almighty Phoenix is on it’s way to Earth. Its target is Hope Summers, Cyclops’ daughter from the future. Cyclops wants to keep Hope on Earth to harness the Phoenix to restore the mutant population, while Captain America wants to take Hope away to prevent the Phoenix from destroying Earth. That’s about as much plot as you need before the fists start flying and the cloud of stupid that occurs from the fight prevents any character from doing anything smart or rational. The name “Avengers vs. X-Men” would better be changed to “Cyclops vs. Captain America” as they are the only two characters that the book seems to focus on. Scarlet Witch and Hope are also very important to the story, but I don’t consider them really characters in this book. They’re just plot devices to keep the story going, and the ending with them is telegraphed by the halfway point.

While he is one of the only characters, Captain America is heavily out of character, All he cares about by the end is being right and beating down Cyclops. When a tragic attack is carried out by an X-Man, all Cap cares about is that this is now a war, even though people are dying all around him. Even Black Panther calls him out on this (he does the same thing to Tony but about science and magic.) The worst part is how hard they try to make Cyclops the villain, when he is only shown doing bad things after he is attacked or provoked. There’s no ambiguity by the end about who the villain is supposed to be, which shouldn’t happen in one of these superhero fight books. Having the villain be the more likable person, while the designated heroes are all jerks is like a double screw up.

There are some good parts in it, the second issue springs to mind. It’s the issue where the fight actually starts and there are some good single fights with pretty funny caption boxes. Spider-Man was also awesome in the book, with his crowning moment appearing in issue 9. The designs of the “Phoenix Five” are pretty good, but the characters themselves don’t really have much of a point. There is also another good fight on the Moon in issue 4.

The Phoenix itself seems to have its powers decided at random, where sometimes it is strong enough to keep Wolverine down for a couple hours and then later only for a couple seconds. It keeps him down for a long time when it wasn’t even close to Earth, but can’t keep him down when it’s in its almost purest form. And when one of the Phoenix Five reveals the ability to give legs to whales, he then remembers that whales don’t like land.

Final Thoughts: Huh, that got a little weird near the end. The book after this AVX Consequences and the AVX: VS tie ins are actually really good and I’d highly recommend those over this. This book is also really long, with too much padding and predictable foreshadowing.

Rating: Borrow from a Mate

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